Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Livestock Nutrition Brisbane, Australia.

Day 2 :

  • Special Session
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Paul Iji is a Professor of Animal Science at the University of New England (UNE), Armidale, Australia. Dr Iji studied in Nigeria, Scotland and Australia and has previously worked in similar positions in Nigeria and South Africa before taking up his current position at the University of New England, Australia. His main area of research is poultry nutrition, with specialization in gastrointestinal physiology. He has supervised and currently supervises several postgraduate students, and has published over 200 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings.

Abstract:

Soybean meal (SBM) is the premier vegetable protein source for poultry. It is typically heat-treated prior to feeding, to improve its quality. In a series of studies, we investigated the potential of replacing commercial SBM (at up to 30 %) with raw meal (RSBM, about 13 498 TIU/g)in diets that were further supplemented with a novel protease and phytase. Both enzymes improved the digestion, in vitro, of RSBM. The RSBM over a short feeding period (14 d) reduced feed intake (FI) and body weight gain (BWG) and this response was worse on steam-pelleted diets. In a longer feeding trial, increasing the level of RSBM reduced BWG in early life but not over 1-35 d. Extra-dosing with microbial protease improvedthe FI and BWG of birds during the early period (1-10 d period) but only marginally over 1-35 d. In another experiment, increasing the inclusion rate of RSBM in the diets significantly increased (p<0.001) the loss of undigested and unabsorbed ileal CP, leading to a reduction in both apparent ileal digestibility and standardized ileal digestibility of CP and most amino acids. There were no major effects of RSBM on intestinal lesions, footpad dermatitis, tibia bone quality or mortality of the birds when the material replaced 25 % of SBM. Protease supplementation improved these variables. Litter N contents increased with increase in dietary RSBM levelbut were slightly reducedwith protease supplementation. Other mechanisms assessed in the studies, including visceral organ weight; intestinal mucosal morphometry and digestive enzyme activities, responded in various ways to RSBM and the test protease. Overall, it can be concluded that RSBM can replace commercial SBM at up to 25 %, if supplemented with the test protease and/or phytase, without compromising productivity or health of broiler chickens.

  • Track 4: Poultry Track 5: Cattle Track 8: Livestock Feed Ingredients Track 10: Feed Supplies
Location: Day 2
Speaker
Biography:

James Templeman completed his Bachelor’s degree (with honours) in Animal Biology at the University of Guelph, in June of 2014. He is currently pursuing a thesis Master’s degree in Animal Nutrition at the University of Guelph. Under the tutelage of Dr. Vern Osborne, Dr. John Cant, and Dr. Michael Rogers, his current project merges dairy cattle nutrition and metabolism with human health science and gel chemistry. He is aiming to publish a comprehensive summary of the unique and promising process necessary to encapsulate nutrients within a foodgrade, rumen-stable, wax-and-alginate emulsification.

Abstract:

This project takes aim at developing a novel and natural nutrient delivery system that incorporates an active ingredient (holy basil, HB) into molecular gels. These gels, or emulsions, are fed to dairy cows alongside their regular diets, and are efficiently transferred to the mammary gland, while resisting degradation during digestion. Gel creation is preformed via emulsification of a stable wax polymer and a sodium alginate (NaAlg) solution, followed by a two-tier gelation process initiated by calcium salts. The wax complex makes up 25% of the gel and is comprised of rice bran wax (2% w/v) and canola oil. It was selected based on its stability (<10% degradation) during 48hr artificial rumen incubation. The NaAlg solution (75% of the gel) is added to the wax solution to be homogenized and emulsified, creating a low viscosity emulsification. A 9:1 solution (CaCO3:CaCl2) is then added to our emulsification at the same time as the HB. The calcium salts induce encapsulation of the HB through immediate and longterm gelation. The insoluble calcium (CaCl2) activates instantaneously, causing rapid gelation, while the insoluble calcium (CaCO3)—activated by a drop in pH—is triggered once the gel reaches the cow’s acidic digestive system. The CaCO3 activation creates sustained gelation; this helps ensure the encapsulated HB survives rumination while on its way to the mammary gland for deposition. This target-specific delivery system will enhance the functional food properties of milk and can be applied to attain marketable, medicinal milk products, unique to the industry in their therapeutic qualities.

Speaker
Biography:

Juan S. Daquioag has completed his PhD in 1Animal Science at College of Agriculture, Cagayan State University.

Abstract:

The study was conductedtodetermine the growth performance and carcass quality of broilers raised under mango plantation fed different levels of crude protein. One hundred fifty two-week old commercial broilers white strain (Cobb 500) were used and distributed equally to the following treatments: T1- 21%CP, T2- 20%CP, T3-19%CP, T4- 18%CP (Control) and T5- 17%CP. These were laid out in completely randomized design with three replications. The birds were fed in restriction for a period of five weeks. Feeds were withdrawn from the birds daily when they are in range, 3 hours in the morning and 3 hours in the afternoon. Results showed that T3 significantly differed with T4 and T5 but not with T1 and T2 with afeed conversion ratio of 2.0.T1 obtained the lowest percentage abdominal fat deposition with 0.74. In terms of profitability, T3 had the best return above feed cost with P178.01 income per chicken. This study revealed that feeding the ranged broilers with 19% CP resulted in better feed efficiency, and income, while 21% CP obtained the least fat deposition.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Parimalendu Haldar was a Professor of Zoology in Visva-Bharati University, India. His areas of interest are Entomology, Ecology, and Environmental Biology. For his research in the field of Entomophagous livestock, he was invited as an expert member of FAO (UNO) at Rome, and also awarded by the Orthopterists’ Society, USA. He has accomplished several Govt. of India funded research projects that produced 12 PhD, 1 edited book and 82 research articles. He is a Fellow of Zoological Society, Calcutta, and West Bengal Academy of Science & Technology. His academic visits to abroad include: Thailand, China, France, Turkey, and Italy.

Abstract:

On the quest of alternative protein sources, researchers have found insects to be nutritionally rich and among insects acridid grasshoppers have a good future. In this context the present work concentrated to formulate various protein rich conventional and acridid supplemented diets to feed the Japanese quail Coturnix japonica. The experiments were divided into two phases. In the first phase various diets were prepared where fish meal was gradually replaced by acridid meal (i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% replacement). Consumption of the diet having 50% replacement of fish meal with acridid meal resulted higher feed utilization and weight gain of the quails, however egg laying performance and meat quality was slightly better in the birds feeding on the diet having 75% acridid inclusion level than the one having 50% acridid inclusion level. This proved that at least 50% fish meal could be replaced by acridid meal. In the second phase fish meal based, soybean meal based and acridid meal based diets were prepared. All of them had three different inclusion levels of the major ingredients (i.e. 5%, 10%, and 15% of the diet). The growth and egg laying performance of C. Japonica was better in most of the cases for 10% acridid meal added diet. This particular diet also gave better results compared to the fish meal based and soybean meal based conventional diets without showing deleterious effect on flesh and egg quality. These encouraging results successfully established acridid grasshoppers as an alternative protein source for poultry birds.

Wei Chen

Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China

Title: Calcium deficiency suppresses follicle growth in laying ducks
Speaker
Biography:

Chen Wei has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Huazhong Agricultural University. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Calcium is very important for maintaining the bone growth and eggshell formation in laying birds. However, some of other biological functions of calcium in laying birds are scarcely known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that calcium may affect the follicle growth of laying ducks by employing calcium-deficient diet. Four hundred and fifty female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) of 22 wk were randomly assigned to 3 groups. Ducks were fed one of two calcium-deficient diets (containing 1.8% or 0.38% calcium, respectively) or a calcium-adequate control diet (containing 3.6% calcium) for 67 d (depletion period), and then ducks of the 3 groups were fed a calcium-adequate diet for an additional 67 d (repletion period). As compared with the calcium-adequate control, the hierarchical ovarian follicles number (diameter>1cm) and total ovary weight of ducks that consumed the diet with 0.38% calcium was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) during the depletion period, accompanied by reduced egg production. The mRNA expression of ovary gap junction protein, alpha 1 (GJA1), gamma 1 (GJC1), delta 2 (GJD2) were decreased after feeding calcium-deficient diets (1.8% or 0.38% calcium, P < 0.05). Transcripts of estradiol receptor 2 (ER2), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) in ovary were reduced in the ducks fed 0.38% calcium or 1.8% calcium (P < 0.05). While the mRNA expression of ovary follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) was decreased in the ducks fed 0.38% calcium but not the 1.8% calcium. The cAMP content in the ovary was increased by calcium depletion (the increase reached 6% for 1.8% calcium and 13% for 0.38%calcium, respectively). Plasma concentrations of estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and calcium was decreased by both of the calcium-deficient diets (P < 0.05). The down-regulated gene expression of gap junction protein, hormone receptor, increased cAMP content, as well as the suppressed follicle growth could be reversed by repletion of dietary calcium. The results of the present study suggest that dietary calcium deficiency negatively affects the follicle growth of laying ducks possibly by down-regulating follicle growth-related genes and hormones.

Speaker
Biography:

Md. Abdul Kader has obtained his PhD in 2011 and carried out postdoctoral studies during 2011-2012 inKagoshima University, Japan. At present, he is a senior lecturer in the School of Fisheries and Aquaculture Sciences, University Malaysia Terengganu, Malaysia. His research interests are sustainable aquafeed, alternative protein sources, nutritional physiology, nutritional immunology and nutrigenomics for aquatic animals. He has published more than 30articles in well recognized journals. He has been serving as reviewers and editorial board members for several reputed journals.Dr. Kader wishes to continue research and academic activities for the wellbeing of humanity and has urged to join hands together for a better world

Abstract:

Effect of partial replacement of fish meal with palm kernel meal on growth performance and oxidative stress of Malaysian prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was evaluated. A closed aquaculture system with 21fibreglass tanks with the capacity of 150 litre was set up for the experiment. Five test diets were formulated by replacing 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% fishmeal with palm kernel meal and labelled as PKM0, PKM10, PKM20, PKM30 and PKM40, respectively. Another two diets were prepared by the supplementation of 2% shrimp meal and 2% squid meal in PKM30 and PKM40 diets which designated as PKM30+ and PKM40+, respectively. All the test diets were iso-nitrogenous (30% crude protein), iso-lipidic (12% crude lipid) and iso-energetic (19 KJ/g DM gross energy). Triplicate groups of 30 post-larvae (0.041 ± 0.001 g) were stocked in previously prepared tanks and fed the test diets at the rate of 20 – 30% of their body weight, twice a day for 60 days. The results showed that there was no significant differences (P>0.05) in final weight (g), percent weight gain (%) and specific growth rate (%/ day) of prawn fed PKM0, PKM10, PKM20 and PKM30 diets. However, all these growth parameters were significantly decreased in prawn fed PKM40 diet compared to fishmeal based control diet (PKM0). Supplementation of crude attractants such as shrimp meal and squid meal recovered the depleted growth performances. It was found that the above growth parameters were significantly improved in PKM30+ and PKM40+ diets compared to all other PKM diets. No significant differences were also found between these groups of prawn and the control group. The feed conversion efficiency and protein efficiency ratio also followed the similar trends where PKM40 showed significantly lowest values compared to the control. The feed utilization parameters were significantly improved in PKM30+ and PKM40+ groups. The survival (%) was not significantly affected by any of the dietary treatments. On the other hand, superoxide dismutase activity was similar in all the dietary treatments except in PKM30. It is concluded that 30% fishmeal can be replaced with PKM in the diets of prawn without any detrimental effects on growth performance and feed utilization. Supplementation of small amount of crude attractants such as squid meal, shrimp meal etc could replace 40% or more fishmeal from the diet of Malaysian prawn

Speaker
Biography:

Yetti Marlida has completed his PhD at the age of 33 years from University Putra Malaysia at 2001 and postdoctoral studies from Cornell University at 2011. She is the Lecturer at Andalas University since 1989. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

This research aims to determine effect of a direct-fed microbial (DFM) on digestibility {dry matter (DM) , organic matter (OM) and crude protein (CP)} and growth performances such as feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency of Bali steer fed oil palm trunk fermented as base diet with the addition of (DFM) of Saccharomyces cerevicea and Pediococcus sp. The experimental design used was a randomized block design consisted of 4 treatments and 4 replicates using 16 Bali steers with an average weight between 120-150 kg/head. Feed treatment applied as follows: A: 70% concentrate + 30% fermented oil palm trunk; B: ration A + 1% Saccharomyces cerevicea; C: ration A + 1% Pediococcus sp; D: ration A + 0.5% Saccharomyces cerevicea + 0.5% Pedicococus sp. The results showed that the treatment provides highly significant effect (P<0.01) on the digestibility of DM, OM CP, feed intake and body weight gain, whereas a significantly effect (P<0.05) to feed efficiency. It can be concluded that the best treatment was the used of ration D with digestibility DM, OM and CP were 70.42%; 73.04% and 69.27% respectively. The ration D also showed that the body weight gain : 1.0 kg/day with feed intake: 4.31 kg and 23.13% feed efficiency.

Speaker
Biography:

Awadhesh Kishore has completed his PhD from DBRA University, India. He is working as a Professor in the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying, Sarvodaya Mahavidyalaya, Chaumuhan, Mathura, India. He has published more than 26 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editor of reputed journal “Journal Rural Advancement”.

Abstract:

Present investigation is an effort to study the effect of manipulation of rumen fermentation using buffers in crossbred calves on rumen environment i.e., pH, content of different VFA and acetate to propionate (A:P) ratio and total nitrogen (TN), ammonia nitrogen, (AN), urea nitrogen (UN) and non urea and ammonia nitrogen (NAUN). Twelve crossbred calves for the purpose was selected (age 131-221 d; live weight LW 57.5-93.9 kg). All of them received grass mixture as green fodder and wheat straw as dry fodder. Concentrate mixture contained barley grain and mustard cake. On the basis of different phenotypic traits the animals were divided into three groups. One animal from each group was randomly allotted to one of the four treatments viz. T1, T2, T3 and T4. Buffer in the form of sodium bicarbonate (S) and magnesium oxide (M) in combination @ 0.00 & 0.00, 0.50 & 0.25, 1.00 & 0.50, 1.50 & 0.75 of assumed dry matter intake to be 4% of LW or 0.0 & 0.0, 0.2 & 0.1, 0.4 & 0.2 and 0.6 & 0.3% of LW were given in T1, T2, T3 and T4, respectively. The ruminal study trial was started on day 30 of the experiment for 5 consecutive days. The rumen liquor samples were collected after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours (h) of feeding buffer. The samples were analyzed to TVFA, pH, acetic acid (AA), butyric acid (BA), iso-butyric acid (IBA), iso-valeric acid (IVA), propionic acid (PA), valeric acid (VA), A:P ratio, TN, AN, UN and NAUN. The data recorded were subjected to statistical analysis using suitable models. The results of the study indicated that pH was fell down, TVFA, BA, VA & A:P ratio increased and AA, PA & AN decreased in rumen liquor due to buffer supplementation. Pattern of pH showed decreasing up to 10 hours, TVFA up to 6 hours, IBA, AN and UN up to 8 hours in rumen liquor after feeding buffer. The overall conclusion can be made on the basis of the observations that the addition of buffer addition in calf nutrition was responsible to manipulate ruminal environment in such a way so that so that it became much helpful to produce surplus fat due to appropriate pH and A:P ratio in the rumen ecosystem.

Speaker
Biography:

D. V. Singh has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 28 years from Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Agra, India. He is the Senior Scientist and Head of Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Kandhamal, (Odisha), India, a premier extension research service organization of Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR). He has published more than 29 papers in reputed journals and transferred technology through 200 institutional trainings, 10 exhibitions, 04 farmers fair, 10 exposure visits, 50 Invited Lectures, 10 Radio Talks, 60 News Coverage and Extension literature. He has also handled 02 Research Projects as Principal Investigator.

Abstract:

This study was conducted to investigate the effect of different levels of Azolla (Azolla pinnata) on performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chicks. 400 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Cobb-500) with 4 treatments and replications (25 birds per replicate) were used. Experimental diets were a corn-soybean based diet with no Azolla (control) and diets containing 5, 10 and 15 % of Azolla. Results indicated that in all rearing periods between treatments, chickens fed diets containing 5 % Azolla powder significantly (p<0.01) had an improved daily weight gain (DWG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to other diets. So that the lowest feed intake, the highest weight gain and lowest (best) feed conversion ratio is related to diets containing 5% Azolla. There were no mortality among the experimental groups. Supplementation of 5% Azolla powder significantly increased of carcass efficiency percentage (p<0.01) and thigh relative percentage (p<0.05) while, the lowest its percentage is related to diets containing 15% Azolla. There were no significant differences among treatments for abdominal fat, liver, gizzard and breast relative percentage. The lowest feed cost per kg of body weight was observed in diets containing 5%Azolla.